CSSN News- May 1st, 2018 CSSN announces new Event category- Suspicious activity

CSSN News
CSSN NEWS

Thanks to those users who supplied constructive criticism and suggestions for improving our website and offerings. We took recent critiques of a post that had been classified as “attempted piracy” to heart, and went to work exploring alternatives and then testing them with a group of users, both new and old. Based on all the feedback we received and balanced by the technical capabilities of our website we have made some changes. We have added the category “Suspicious activity – threatening or potentially dangerous activity by others” to the main events menu for use by those making reports going forward.

Users made it quite clear that they want CSSN to collect, vet and report about suspicious activities that do not meet the threshold of attempted piracy, and that these events should be properly classified and labelled plainly. To accomplish this CSSN will consider carefully and evaluate each report, and validate/assign the event type category considering the constellation of factors that combine uniquely in each situation. We will then publish in accordance with our established processes.

Further, it was also made clear that you not only want the information, you want to see it on our very popular and easy to use interactive maps, but in a way that differentiates suspicious activity from other piracy events. To that end you will now see Suspicious activity events on the dedicated piracy (and all other interactive maps), but designated by the color yellow marker to make it easier to identify this subset on the spectrum of piracy activity and facilitate risk assessment and planning.

Additionally, we reviewed all of the previously classified Attempted piracy events and decided to re-categorize 2 of them. The recent event off Trinidad that brought this issue to the forefront, and one older event from 2017, also off Trinidad. We have updated these records event type and in accordance with their new category they now appear as yellow markers on the maps, making them easy to identify and distinguish.

Our mission and values remain unchanged – CSSN informs, captains decide.
We continue to welcome your feedback, contact us.

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CSSN News April 28, 2018 – SSCA Trans-Atlantic HF Net is operational

CSSN News
CSSN NEWS

CSSN is proud to announce that our longtime partner the Seven Seas Cruising Association (SSCA) has added to their sponsorship of HF nets for the cruising community. The daily “KPK” net on 8104 kHz at 0815 Atlantic Standard Time, managed by Glenn Tuttle, continues to provide much appreciated assistance to the cruising community in the Caribbean, the Bahamas and along the US coast with the assistance of land station KJM.

SSCA
CSSN is Proud to partner with SSCA and KPK (SSB 8104 12:15 Daily)

They have added an evening Trans-Atlantic Cruisers HF net, frequency 12350 kHz, to support those yachts making transatlantic passages. This valuable resource operates at 2130 UTC (1730 Eastern Daylight Time). Four US based FCC Coastal Maritime Stations support this effort.

The net controllers are:
Chris Parker, Coastal license WCY, Lakeland, FL;
Dick Giddings, Coastal license KNC, Dover, NC;
Jim West, Coastal license KJM, Ellijay, GA;
Glenn Tuttle, Coastal license KPK, Punta Gorda, FL (Net Manager)

The purpose of this new net (and the daily “KPK” net) is to pass emergency and priority traffic as well as traffic related to safety and security but focused on vessels making long ocean passages.

This net can assist with radio checks, float plans, telephone contact with family & friends, boat to boat relays, access to medical or mechanical professionals, Internet searches, or any other assistance that they can provide.

They have coordinated their efforts with the afternoon Doo Dah Net, managed by Dick Giddings, to include check-ins for the Trans-Atlantic Cruisers Net. The Doo Dah Net is considered a follow-up net to the Cruiseheimers morning Net, passing traffic to cruisers from family members, and taking position reports from vessels on passage and recently arrived.

The Doo Dah Net begins daily at 2100 UTC (1700 Eastern Daylight Time) on 8152 kHz. The Doo Dah Net will continue the same way it has always been run by with the exception of now welcoming any vessel wishing to check into the Trans-Atlantic Cruisers’ Net. Any vessel needing specialized help, like a phone patch, internet search, etc., can be taken to 8104 kHz to allow the Doo Dah Net to continue uninterrupted.

At approximately 2130 UTC (1730 Eastern Daylight Time), or upon the conclusion of the Doo Dah Net, the Trans-Atlantic Cruisers Net will become operational on 12350 kHz. The net controller(s) will monitor this frequency until approximately 2200 UTC (1800 Eastern Daylight Time) when Chris Parker, WCY comes on with his regularly scheduled weather broadcast.

All involved collectively anticipate that this new net will serve the needs of the cruising community more effectively. As before, all vessels are welcome to utilize these nets and relays are always welcomed.

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April 17, 2018 – We can, and will, do better

Recently CSSN published a firsthand report about events reported to us that occurred on a passage from Trinidad to Grenada. The captain that submitted the report used our online form and chose from the options there – Attempted Piracy. The report was vetted and then published, and accurately described what occurred.

A few readers contacted us concerned that the categorization of the events did not meet the specific definition of the existing category “Attempted Piracy”. And they were right.

So we will make some changes after considering a broad range of possibilities, including those that some readers have thoughtfully suggested, balanced by the technical realities of our website, and the resources of our all-volunteer team.

We appreciate constructive input and look forward to improving our service to the cruising community. Stay tuned, and Know Before You Go !
Kim White

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March 28th, 2018 – Rodney Bay – Persistent problems remain unchecked

CSSN News
CSSN NEWS

CSSN has received 14 incident reports from the Rodney Bay area since late December 2017. Use Zoom- Tap, Know & Go to review all of the individual incidents there. They include all manner of theft – daytime, nighttime, all areas of the bay, the marina, and the lagoon. In-the-water dinghies/outboards seem to be the principal target and the thieves are well tooled, quiet and quick. Cruisers should use maximum precautions to secure dinghies at all times, including daylight hours, if you choose to visit there. Lifting and securely locking the dinghy at night is advisable. The thieves operating in Rodney Bay have regularly demonstrated an ability to compromise all but the most robust of locking systems.

2018 incidents in Rodney Bay & Marina
Hotspot map

It is unclear who, if anyone, will provide the leadership and the resources to address this persistent problem in Rodney Bay. Meanwhile, if you are a victim make an online report to CSSN, and an in-person report to both Customs (they have helped return some found but engineless dinghies and do have an operational boat) and the police. Scarce resources won’t get allocated to solve a problem that does not “officially” exist. We will advise of any changes in local reporting methods when/if they are agreed by local officials and stakeholders in St. Lucia.

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